Bachelor in International Business

Program Director
Dr. Thi Le Hoa VO
thi-le-hoa.vo@univ-rennes1.fr

Program Coordinator
Pom Jactin
Assistante
secret-pedag-fi@univ-rennes1.fr
Tél : + 33 (0)2 23 23 60 06

Registrations 
Head of the full-time training office
Hélène CHOTARD
secret-pedag-fi@univ-rennes1.fr
Tél : 02 23 23 70 61

Applications between February 26 and April 14, 2022

The objective of the International Business (IB) track of the “Licence de Gestion” (Bachelor’s) is to provide a complete view of management sciences – finance, management control, HRM, marketing – in English to students with an international professional project. The majority of courses are attended by both French students, incoming exchange students and double degree students, allowing mutual enrichment in a multicultural environment. An excellent level of English as well as an internationally-oriented professional project is required in order to gain access to this “Licence” program.

The International Business track of the “Licence de Gestion”, whose vast majority of courses are in English, allows students to gain experience in a multicultural environment, while studying in France.

Why finish your degree course at IGR-IAE Rennes?
•    For the subjects taught, essential prerequisites for specialization masters
•    To acquire a groundwork of essential knowledge in all areas of management: marketing, HRM, finance … This avenue is the guarantee of an easier professional integration and career development
•    To develop managerial skills through participation in the Institute’s associative life
•    For international openings: to do your Licence 3 at IGR-IAE will give you the opportunity to study your master 1, or part of it, in one of IGR-IAE’s partner universities
•    To benefit from the Career Week, a whole week dedicated to professional integration and construction of your career plan: meetings with professionals, workshops on tools to help you find a job, preparation for job interviews, career and employment events,…
•    For the mandatory professional experience: in-company internship of 8 weeks minimum, preferably abroad or in a French company with an international mission. A Careers & Internships department assists students in their internship search with: online internship offer dissemination platform and a database of partner companies.

Continuation of studies in a master of management, either in Rennes in one of the various masters taught full-time or part-time at IGR-IAE (finance, human resources, marketing or management control and organizational audit), or abroad in one of IGR-IAE’s partner universities. The Bachelor’s in International Business is perfectly suited to taking a double degree in one of IGR-IAE’s partner universities abroad.

Classes in English are taught by foreign teachers as well as by teacher-researchers from IGR-IAE.

The Bachelor’s in International Business is concluded by a mandatory in-company internship, preferably abroad or in a French company with an international mission.

 

Licence

  • Objectifs

    L’objectif est de rappeler les fondamentaux de la comptabilité de gestion et des méthodes usuelles de calcul des coûts

    Compétences à acquérir

    ·Comprendre le comportement des charges (directes vs indirectes, fixes vs variables, etc.)

    ·Calculer et interpréter un seuil de rentabilité

    ·Calculer le coût de revient d’un produit

    ·Rapprocher la comptabilité financière de la comptabilité de gestion

    Programme de cours
    • Notions fondamentales (coût variable vs fixe, direct vs indirect, contrôlable vs non-contrôlable, discrétionnaire, etc.)
    • Analyse en coût partiel : évaluation du seuil de rentabilité
    • Analyse en coût complet : méthode des centres d’analyse
    • Imputation rationnelle des charges de structure

     

    Bibliographie

    DCG 11, Contrôle de Gestion, Manuel et Applications, Claude Alazard et Sabine Sépari, Edition DUNOD

    Comptabilité de Gestion, 7ème Edition, Christian Goujet, Christian Raulet et Christianne Raulet, Edition DUNOD

    Contrôle de gestion, Exercices et corrigés, Caroline Tahar et Aurélien Ragaigne, Edition Gualino

    Pré-requis

    ·Lecture des états financiers

    Objectifs

    Remise à niveau en comptabilité générale.

     

    Compétences à acquérir

    Les grands principes de la comptabilité générale.

     

    Programme
    • Introduction
    • Principes de la comptabilité générale
    • Exercices d’application

    Objectifs

    Remise à niveau statistiques afin de pouvoir utiliser les indicateurs courants en statistiques et les principales lois de probabilité utiles dans différentes matières de gestion.

    Compétences à acquérir

    Les différents types de variables, les indicateurs de description des données, les lois de probabilité usuelles, l’utilisation d’un test (test du Khi-Deux)

    Programme

    Quelques définitions de base
    Chapitre 1 : Description des données, paramètres de position (mode, médiane, moyenne) et de dispersion (variance et écart type, intervalle inter-quartiles)
    Chapitre 2 : Lois de probabilité usuelles : loi discrète uniforme, loi binomiale, loi de poisson et loi normale
    Chapitre 3 : Test du Khi-deux.

    Bibliographie

    Statistiques et probabilités en économie-gestion, Benjamin Legros, 2ème edition, Dunod, 2016

    Statistiques pour la gestion, Pierre-Charles Pupion, Dunod, 2012

    Méthodes d’évaluation

    Néant

    Pré-requis

    Cours de statistiques fin du lycée

    Objectives

    The aim of the course is to initiate students:
    – to read and analyse different financial statements of companies
    – to detect companies financial problems
    – to find solutions to those problems

    Skills to be acquired

    The students will be able:
    – to read companies’ financial statements: balance sheet, income statement…
    – to understand the main concepts used in financial analysis: investments, working capital, expenses, liabilities, assets…
    – to learn about different sources of funding
    – to evaluate the financial stringency of companies

    Program

    Chapter 1 : Financial balance-sheet
    Chapter 2 : Functional balance-sheet
    Chapter 3 : Self-financing ability and adjsuted Intermediate Balances
    Chapter 4 : Financing table

    Bibliography

    – Stephen A Ross, Randolph W. Westerfield, Jeffery Jaffe, Bradford D Jordan & Ram Kumar Kakani (2017) Corporate Finance, 11th ed. Mac Graw Hill Education
    – Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice

    Prerequisites

    Basic knowledge in general accounting

    Objectives

    – to know what is and means HRM, HRD, Organization
    – to do the link between Organizations and HRM contingency

    Skills to be acquired

    HRM bases for beginners

    Program

    1.    What is HRM ? Differences between HRM and HR development
    2.    Case Study : the Bio case
    3.    What is an organization ?
    4.    Organizations and HRM contingency
    5.    Case Study on a topic (motivation, commitment, indentification & managerial insights)

    Bibliography

    Given for each chapter, during the course

    Prerequisites

    No

    Objectives

    This course aims to present the main concepts and levers that a marketing executive may activate to embody the positioning and stimulate the sales of a product/service (mainly on short-termed perspective).

    Skills to be acquired

    Be able to analyze basic marketing strategy (STP approach), identify and understand the marketing policy.

    Program

    Chapter 1 : the marketing strategy
    Chapter 2: Product policy and portfolio management
    Chapter 3: product retailing policy
    Chapter 4: Product pricing policy
    Chapter 5: Product promotion policy

    Bibliography

    Principles of Marketing (15th Edition) 15th Edition, by Philip T. Kotler (Author),? Gary Armstrong (Author)
    Mercator 11e édition – Tout le marketing à l’ère numérique (2014) de Jacques Lendrevie et Julien Lévy
    Marketing (2014), Sous la direction de  Jean-Marc Ferrandi, Marie-Christine Lichtle, Dunod

    Prerequisites

    No

    Objectives

    This module develops an understanding of the role of bugeting within an organisation. It will enhance the ability to prepare, analyze, interpret, critically evaluate and use data for planning and control.
    It also develops an awareness of actual management accounting practice and an interest in emerging issues in management accounting.

    Skills to be acquired

    1.    Define a budget and show how budgets, objectives and strategic plans are related.
    2.    Explain the budgeting process and the interlinking of the various budgets within the business.
    3.    Construct various budgets from relevant data.
    4.    Discuss the criticisms that are made of budgeting.
    5.    Undertake variance analysis and discuss possible reasons for the variances calculated.

    Program

    1.    Budgeting
    •    Budgets and budgeting process: nature and objectives of budgets, operating budget and master budget, link with strategy
    •    Preparing a budget: the budget-setting process, the interrelationship of budgets, operating and master budgets
    •    Current issues in budgeting: criticism of budgeting, rolling forecasts, activity-based budgeting (ABB), zero-based budgeting (ZBB), beyond budgeting
    2.    Variance Analysis
    •    Basic concepts
    •    Level 1 analysis: Total variance
    •    Level 2 analysis: Flexible budget variance and sales volume variance
    •    Level 3 analysis: Sales price variance, price variances and efficiency variances for direct-cost inputs, fixed overhead costs variance
    •    Reconciling the budgeted profit with the actual income

    Bibliography

    Atrill P. et McLaney E. (2009). Management Accounting for Decision Makers, Pearson Education.
    Horngren C.T., Datar S. et Rajan M. (2015). Cost accounting: A managerial emphasis 15th edition, Pearson Education.
    Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge in financial accounting and cost calculation

    Objectives

    – knowledge : Better perceive the human dimension of the actors in the organization
    – Know-how to be : To better understand one’s own way of working – one’s own communication
    – Know-how : be able to lead the change

    Program :

    – Introduction / Setting individual and collective objectives
    Theme 1 What is Organizational Psychology
    – Foundations and schools
    – Theme 2 Groups and the dynamics of teamwork
    – Theme 3 Motivation and personal development dynamics

    Evaluation methods :

    – Presentation of a deliverable counting for 40%,
    – Writing of a written report counting for 60% – in groups of 5 – 10 pages maximum

    Teaching methods

    I listen and I forget, I do and I understand. You will be put in situations on a regular basis in order to experience the themes as much as possible. (Tests, surveys, exercises, role plays). If you are curious and investigative, you will most likely start this new year by building a free will based on self-knowledge, in order to better listen to yourself, to motivate yourself, to motivate others.

    Recommended bibliography :

    Philippe BURG, Pierre JARDILLIER, ” Psychology and Management “, Collection Que sais-je?
    Laurent GOUNELLE, ” L’homme qui voulait être heureux “,
    Laurent GOUNELLE, ” les dieux voyagent toujours incognito “,
    Laurent ALEXANDRE, “La guerre des intelligences
    Philippe RODET, Yves DESJACQUES ” Le Management bienveillant “.

    For more information:

    – Claude LEVY-LEBOYER, ” La Motivation dans l’entreprise (Modèles et stratégies) “, Paris, Editions d’Organisation, (1998).
    – Paul Spector, ” Psychologie du travail et des organisations ” Collection : Ouvertures psychologiques Editeur : De Boeck
    – Alexandre-Bailly F., Bourgeois D., Gruère J-P., Raulet-Croset N. & Roland-Lévy C.: ” Comportements humains et management ” ; Pearson (2006).
    – Morin E.M. & Aubé C., ” Psychologie et management ” ; Chenelière Education (2007).
    – Myers D.G., ” Psychologie sociale pour managers ” ; Dunod (2006).
    – Robbins S. & Judge T., ” Comportements organisationnels ” ; Pearson (2006).
    – Vallerand Robert J., ” Les fondements de la psychologie sociale ” ; (2006).
    – Eugène ENRIQUEZ, ” Les Jeux du pouvoir et du désir dans l’entreprise “, Paris, Desclée de Brouwer, collection Sociologie Clinique, (1997).
    – Eric BERNE, “des scenarios et des hommes”) (2010)

    Prerequisites :

    your curiosity, your ability to observe, listen, share, your commitment.

    Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

    Objectives

    The main objective of this course is to assist students to develop an initial understanding of supply chain management and logistics.  Secondly, students are invited to reflect on some of the changes in the organization of global supply chains over the last half-century and the concomitant economic, social and environmental impacts. The final objective is for students to gain an understanding of the challenges facing companies seeking to manage modern global supply chains and to consider how they may change in the future.

    Skills to be acquired

    At the end of this course, students should be able to:

    Understand some of the basic logistics tools and methods
    Describe and discuss some of the main logistics and supply chain challenges that firms face;
    Appreciate some of the changes and evolutions that have taken place in supply chains in recent times;
    Consider how questions of sustainability are applied to the management of modern supply chains.

    Programme

    Subject

    Some keywords

    1. Logistics and supply chain management : history and definitions Upstream and downstream, physical and information flows, optimization, lead time, demand pull and supply push, integration and coordination, Bullwhip effect, ERP, Taylorism and Fordism, mass production and mass customization, lean and agile, Just-in-time, Kanban and 5S, PDCA
    2. Distribution, Logistics and warehousing 3 and 4PLs;  Regional Distribution Centres, multiple distribution channnels, logistic service providers, different inter-firm models, automated warehouses, number of references, order preparation, materials handling, impact of digitalization
    3. Supply chain theory Transaction cost analysis, bounded rationality and opportunism, Resource Based view, Agency theory, Networks – Activities, Resources and Actors model, power and governance, SCM theory, barriers to entry, asymmetries
    4. Managing global supply chains Globalization, internationalization, complexity, supply chain strategy, trade-offs, drivers, deregulation, FDI, growth in trade of intermediate goods, TNCs, container transport, tracking, free trade agreements, long lead times, global value chains
    5. Sustainable supply chain management Definition of sustainability, triple bottom line, Reverse Logistics, recoverable manufacturing systems, the Anthropocene,  closed loop systems, metrics and measurement, material recovery rates, ethics,

    exploitation, child labour, accountability, corporate social responsibility

    6. Outsourcing and offshoring Make or buy decision, subcontracting, reshoring, nearshoring, inshoring, core capabilities, relocation, downsizing, internal and external sourcing, asset specificity, firm boundaries, supplier visibility, buyer-supplier relationships
    Bibliography

    Arnold, J.R.T. (2012) Introduction to Materials Management (seventh edition), London: Pearson
    Berger, S. (2006) Made in Monde (traduit de l’anglais), Paris: Seuil
    Berger, S. (2012) Toward a Third Industrial Divide. in P. Osterman (Ed), Economy in Society: Essays in honor of Michael J. Piore, Cambridge, MA,  MIT Press.
    Brun, D & Guérin, F. (2014) La Logistique: ses métiers, ses enjeux, son avenir, Cormelles-le-royal : Editions EMS
    Carter, C.R., Rogers, D.S. & Choi, T.Y. (2015) Toward the Theory of the Supply Chain, Journal of Supply Chain Management, 51 (2), 89-97.
    Chopra, S. and Meindl, P. (2010) Supply Chain Management: Strategy, Planning and Operation, London: Pearson
    Christopher, M. (2005) Logistics and Supply Chain Management, London: Pearson
    Coe, N.M. & Yeung, H.W-C. (2015) Global Production Networks: Theorizing Economic Development in an interconnected world. Oxford: Oxford University Press
    Contractor, F.K. (ed.) (2011) Global Outsourcing and Offshoring: An Integrated Approach to Theory and Corporate Strategy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    Cooper, M., Lambert, D. & Pagh, J. (1997) “Supply Chain Management: More Than a New Name for Logistics “, The International Journal of Logistics Management, Vol. 8 Iss 1 pp. 1 – 14 http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09574099710805556
    Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift, London: Sage
    Forrester, J. (1958) “Industrial Dynamics: a major breakthrough for decision makers”, Harvard Business Review, July-August 1958
    Frankel, R., Bolumole, Y.A., Eltantawy, R.A., Paulraj, A. and Gundlach, G.T. (2008). The domain and scope of SCM’s foundational disciplines – insights and issues to advance research.  Journal of Business Logistics, 29(1), 1-30.
    Gattorna, J. (2009) Dynamic Supply Chain Alignment, Farnham: Gower
    Gibson, B.J., Mentzer, J.T. and Cook, R.L. (2005). Supply Chain Management: the pursuit of a consensus definition. Journal of Business Logistics, 26(2), 17-28.
    Goldratt, E.M and Cox, J. (2006 – 3rd ed.) Le But – un processus de progrès permanent. AFNOR.
    Halldorsson, A., Kotzab, H., Mikkola, J.H. and Skjott-Larsen, T. (2007). Complementary theories to supply chain management. Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, 12(4), 284-296. Available from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/13598540710759808
    Halldorsson, A., Kotzab, H., and Skjott-Larsen, T. (2009). Supply chain management on the crossroads to sustainability: a blessing or a curse? Logistics Research, 1, 83-94
    Harrison, A. and van Hoek, R. (2005) Logistics Management and Strategy, Harlow: Pearson
    Ietto-Gillies, G. (2012). Transnational Corporations and International Production: Concepts, Theories and Effects, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
    Jacoby, D. (2009). Guide to Supply Chain Management, London: Profile Books.
    Logistiques Magazine (mensuel)
    Lysons, K. and Farrington, B. (2012). Purchasing and Supply Chain Management, Harlow, UK: Pearson.
    Macdonald, K. (2014) The Politics of Global Supply Chains: Power and Governance beyond the state, Cambridge: Polity Press
    Marsh, P. (2012) The New Industrial Revolution: consumers, globalization and the end of mass production, New Haven: Yale University Press
    Mentzer, T., de Witt, W., Keebler, J., Min, S., Nix, N., Smith, C. and Zacharia, Z. (2001), “Defining supply chain management”, Journal of Business Logistics, Vol. 22 No.2, pp. 1-26.
    Mentzer, J.T., Myers, M.B. and Stank, T.P. (eds.) (2007) Handbook of Global Supply Chain Management. London: Sage
    Montreuil, B. (2011) Towards a Physical Internet: Meeting the Global Logistics Sustainability Grand Challenge. Available at: https://www.cirrelt.ca/DocumentsTravail/CIRRELT-2011-03.pdf
    Paché, G. (2004) La Logistique: Enjeux Stratégiques, Paris: Vuibert
    Rivoli, P. (2005) Les Aventures d’un Tee-Shirt dans l’économie globalisée (traduit de l’anglais), Paris : Fayard
    Rodrik, D. (2011) The Globalization Paradox, Oxford: OUP
    Skjott-Larsen, T., Schary, P.B., Mikkola, J.H. and Kotzab, H. (2007). Managing the global supply chain, Copenhagen: CBS Press.
    Strategies Logistiques (bimestriel)
    Street Vox – Les 700,000 ouvriers invisibles des usines a colis françaises.  https://www.streetpress.com/sujet/1484676734-ouvriers-invisibles-des-usines-colis-francaises
    Supply Chain Magazine
    Waters D.(ed.) (2007) Global Logistics, London: Kogan Page

    Objectives

    Competitive intelligence aims at understanding the new (or renewed) forms of economic competition in the network society as it has developed since the oil crises of the 1970s. Thanks to an extensive approach that combines economics, management, law and sociology, competitive intelligence deals with the structures and dynamics of competitive forces at work in 21st century society : intangible assets management, hyper-competition or co-petition, competition through legal, technical or social standards, non-market strategies, anticipation and influence… These issues are considered from both private actors point of view (strengthening the competitiveness of companies) and policy makers point of view (implementing policies in line with a turbulent environment upset by the globalization of exchanges, finance domination, technological innovations or geopolitical approach of economic activities …).

     

    Skills to acquire

    At the end of the course, the students will be able to mix the concepts and tools of different social sciences to take an overview of economic competition in the society of the XXI ° century. They will be able to analyze comprehensive competitive strategies (market and non market strategies ). They will integrate the multiple dimensions of competition in the decision-making processes related to companies strategies. They will perceive the key factors underlying the competitiveness of companies and countries in contemporary economics..

    Program/Curriculum

    INTRODUCTION
    1.    Stylized Facts in the XXIst Century Competition
    2.    Competitive Intelligence : Definitions
    3.    Two Visions of Competitive intelligence

    A NARROW APPROACH TO COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE :
    1.    Why Competitive Intelligence in the Contemporary Economics?
    2.    What Priorities in Monitoring the Environment ?
    3.    How to Monitor the Environment ?
    4.    How Far is it Legally and Ethically Possible to Monitor the Environment ?

    A WIDE APPROACH TO COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE
    1.    Market and Non Market Strategy : an Integrated Approach to Strategy
    2.    Taking Advantage of Social Norms : Influence, Rating and Labeling
    3.    Taking Advantage of Legal Norms : Litigation and Lobbying

    Selected bibliography

    BACH, David, 2010. Analyzing the Nonmarket Environment of Business : the (ia) Framework. ie Bueiness School [en ligne]. 2010. N° 25 mars. Disponible à l’adresse : https://yale.instructure.com/courses/29331/files/1391813/download?verifier=CBO2a6G5AjMgTC9mirBb1aiv7SKhOOYNJnCmxMxo&wrap=1

    BARON, David P., 1995. Integrated strategy: Market and nonmarket components. California management review. 1995. Vol. 37, n° 2, pp. 47–65.

    BRANDENBURGER, Adam M et NALEBUFF, Barry J, 1996. Co-opetition. London : Harper & Collins Business.

    CASTELLS, Manuel, 2009. The Rise of the Network Society: The Information Age: Economy, Society, and Culture. 2nd. Wiley-Blackwell.

    CHAMPAUD, Claude & DANET, Didier, Stratégies judiciaires des entreprises, Dalloz, 2014

    D’AVENI, Richard A., 1995. Coping with hypercompetition: Utilizing the new 7S’s framework. Academy of Management Perspectives. 1995. Vol. 9, n° 3, pp. 45–57.

    DAY, G. S et SCHOEMAKER, P. J.H, 2005. Scanning the periphery. Harvard Business Review. 2005. Vol. 83, n° 11, pp. 135.

    HUSSEY, David et JENSTER, Per V., 1999. Competitor intelligence: turning analysis into success. Wiley.

    JONES, Milo et SILBERZAHN, Philippe, 2013. Constructing Cassandra: reframing intelligence failure at the CIA, 1947–2001. Stanford University Press.

    KAHANER, Larry, 1997. Competitive intelligence: how to gather analyze and use information to move your business to the top. Simon and Schuster.

    MOULIER-BOUTANG, Yann, 2011. Cognitive capitalism. Polity.

    PORTER, Michael E., 1998. Clusters and the New Economics of Competition. Harvard Business Review. November December. 1998. pp. 77 97.

    PORTER, Michael E., 2008. The five competitive forces that shape strategy. Harvard business review. 2008. Vol. 86, n° 1, pp. 78–93.

    PRAHALAD, Coimbatore Krishna, 2009. The fortune at the bottom of the pyramid, revised and updated 5th anniversary edition: Eradicating poverty through profits. FT Press.

    TEECE, David J., 1998. Capturing value from knowledge assets: The new economy, markets for know-how, and intangible assets. California management review. 1998. Vol. 40, n° 3, pp. 55–79.

    Pré-requis

    Basics in Law, Economics & Management

    Assessment

    Brief paper

     

    Objectives

    To understand the institutional functioning of the European Union as well as the various European policies, which are implemented in the Member States.
    To focus on the economic and monetary policies, solidarity and innovation.
    To strengthen the methodology of the students.
    To develop a general understanding of the EU for better career opportunities.

    Skills to be acquired

    Students should be able to acquire basic knowledge on the dynamics and roles of the european institutions, and develop and analyse it through current affairs.

    Program

    1.    The European Union, an historical construction
    2.    The European Union, a political project
    3.    The EU, an institutional architecture (Lisbon Treaty)

    PART 1: The Working of the European Union
    Chapter 1: the institutions of the EU
    Chapter 2: other institutions of the European Union

    PART 2: European Law and Finances
    Chapter 1 : European legal system
    Chapter 2 : European Finances

    Bibliography

    The bibliography below covers key materials but is by no means exhaustive.
    –    Primary sources: Eur-lex http://eur-lex.europa.eu/en/ and European Union website http://europa.eu (direct, free access to all EU documents and legislation, press releases and different other sources).
    –    Secondary sources:  textbooks, academic journals, etc.
    –    Bomber, E. & Stubb, A. (2008). The European Union: How Does It Work? Oxford, Oxford University Press.
    –    McCormick, J. (2008). Understanding the European Union. A Concise Introduction, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan.
    –    Press: The Financial Times offers excellent coverage of European affairs.

    Prerequisites

    Students should have a general knowledge and they should be interested in current affairs.

    Objectifs

    The goal is to broaden the students’ knowledge and mastery of English by studying concepts related to their field, such as Innovation, Company Law, Branding, Recruiting and PR.

     

    Compétences à acquérir

    The students will be expected to carry out analyses of business documents, articles, and audio-visual documents and share ideas in workshops, present their ideas and report on them.

     

    Programme

    Setting up a company in the USA:

    First term (Semestre 1)

    Innovation: conceive a new product/service

    Company Law: choose the best business structure

    Branding: develop your strategy

     

    Bibliographie

    For grammar references:

    Advanced Grammar in Use, Martin Hewings, Cambridge University Press, third edition (book, ebook or app available)

     

    Pré-requis

    CEFR Levels: B2-C1

    1 cours au choix parmi :

    – Espagnol approfondi

    – Espagnol

    – Allemand

    – Chinois débutant

     

    Espagnol

    Objectifs

    Prise de parole fluide, sans lecture (support fiche/plan autorisé).

    Appropriation et argumentation des thèmes abordés.

    Savoir participer à un débat, proposer des situations en lien avec le thème traité.

    Maîtrise des temps du passé. Renforcement des bases grammaticales ;

    Connaissance du cinéma d’Espagne et d’Amérique latine (argentin/chilien)

     

    Compétences à acquérir

    Oral en continu et en interaction.
    Compréhension de l’écrit et de l’oral.

    Vocabulaire/expression du champ lexical des thèmes culturels abordés et répliques de l’interaction.

    Savoir proposer et défendre un projet dans un contexte donné, une actualité donnée.

    Programme

    Les caractéristiques et spécificités culturelles dans la vie quotidienne et l’entreprise. Cas de IBERDROLA ; changement d’horaires.

    Marketing politique, cas d’entreprises en Amérique latine.

    Campagnes, affiches d’entreprises et/ ou d’ONG.

    Spécificités de la langue espagnol (données de l’institut Cervantes)

    La Ruta Quetzal

    En fonction de l’actualité : salons/ polémiques/expos/conférences.

    Echanges avec le groupe avancé, en milieu de semestre sur la création d’entreprise. Vote pour le meilleur projet.

     

    Bibliographie

    Compréhension de l’écrit :

    El País / Público.es / capital / bbc espagnol

    Compréhension de l’oral :

    Audiolingua/radialistas,net/rtve.es

    Expression écrite : ver-taal/gram@clicando/larouss,fr/ wordreference

    Pré-requis

    B1 à B2

    Espagnol approfondi

    Programme

    Contenu thématique

    Semestre 1 – Búsqueda de empleo y la contratación de personal : préparation de CV, de lettres de motivation et d’entretiens d’embauche en espagnol

    Semestre 2 – Negociación y Manejo de crisis: Études de cas professionnels et de l’actualité du monde de l’entreprise de l’aire culturelle hispanophone

    Contenu linguistique et supports

    Semestre 1 – Búsqueda de empleo y la contratación de personal : études de documents (supports papier, audio, vidéo, en ligne…) pour connaître les règles de présentation d’une petite annonce, d’un CV et d’une lettre de motivation en espagnol. Rédaction des documents dans le respect de ces règles. Jeux de rôles, type cabinet de conseil en recherche d’emploi. Études de documents (supports papier, audio, vidéo, en ligne…) pour connaître la façon dont se déroule un entretien, puis simulations d’entretiens.

    Semestre 2 – negociación y manejo de crisis: étude et présentation d’articles (compréhension écrite et expression orale en continu), étude et présentation de sujets sur support audio et/ou vidéo (compréhension orale et expression orale en continu), débats et mises en situation autour de ces thèmes (expression orale en interaction), rédaction de synthèse de documents et de communiqués de presse.

    Travaux individuels et travaux de groupes.

    Bibliographie

    Donnée par l’enseignant.

    Pré-requis

    B1 à B2

     

    Allemand

    Programme

    Les acteurs dans l’économie

    L’argent

    – homo oeconomicus

    – riche/pauvre, le revenu, le bonheur

    – vivre sans argent

    La publicité

    – comment ça marche ?

    – « neuro marketing »

    La génération Y et les implications pour le monde du travail

    – de nouvelles formes de travail

    – postuler pour un emploi

    Jeu de rôle

    – « hire or fire », droit du travail

    – « corporate citizenship »

    Fair trade

    – développement durable

    – mode (fair wear)

    Oraux interactifs en S2 sur des sujets imposés

    Bibliographie

    Transmise par l’enseignant au premier TD.

     

    Chinois

    Objectifs

    Amener les élèves au niveau A1 ou A2 du CECRL (selon le niveau de départ):

    • Etre capable de se présenter
    • Etre capable de se déplacer en Chine
    Compétences à acquérir
    • Prioritairement l’oral : compréhension et expression
    • A l’écrit, l’accent est mis davantage sur :
    •  l’apprentissage des caractères les plus courants et leur culture associée.
    • Le pinyin (phonétique chinoise)
    Programme
    • Se présenter en chinois (identité, loisirs, activités quotidiennes, modes de déplacement…)
    • Comprendre un de leur camarade lorsqu’il se présente en chinois et le présenter à leur tour.
    Bibliographie

    Les cours sont préparés et distribués par l’enseignant (textes, fiches d’écriture, fichiers audio…).

    Des informations plus précises sont données en cours d’année au fur et à mesure des apprentissages (sites internet utiles, applications de dictionnaires, films…)

    Pré-requis

    Aucun

    OBJECTIVES :

    – Open your horizon to management culture and cultural studies
    – Work on your oral and written feedback skills

    TERMS AND CONDITIONS

    – The student must attend at least one conference per semester at IGR-IAE and participate in at least one event  outside IGR (exhibition, play, conference)
    – The conference program at IGR-IAE will be announced at the end of September
    – For the event outside IGR, the student is free to organize his search, registration and participation (note: many events / conferences are free of charge. Check the  websites of the city of Rennes, the tourist office, the city of science etc.)

    FEEDBACK

    – by groups of two students (no more, no less)
    o A 180-second video to present the event attended and its historical, political or cultural background (contextualization of your reflection).
    o A 2-page summary, offering a critical and analytical reading (political, social, philosophical) of the external event
    o A 2-page synthesis offering a critical and analytical reading (political, social, philosophical) of the IGR-IAE conference(s)

    ASSESSMENT

    – Quality of the form of the feedback:
    dynamism, originality, ability to draw attention, quality of writing and richness of vocabulary (spoken and written), careful presentation: video editing, readability, layout, spelling of written work, etc.

    – General organization :
    introduction containing a catchphrase and the announcement of a relevant and structured plan, balance between the different parts of the announced plan, ideas classified in a logical and clear order, neat and synthetic  conclusion.

    – Quality of the contents:
    understanding the subject matter and the restitution of essential ideas, synthesis and clarity, critical thinking, analytical skills, ancillary research that has deepened the subject

    Objectives 

    The “Associative Project Management” option is an opportunity for students to put into practice all the theoretical knowledge covered during their studies and also to acquire new skills:

    • Introduction to the Associative Project and particularity of the associative environment.
    • Application of theoretical knowledge: Strategy, Finance, Team Management, Communication, Project Management.
    • Formalization and intelligibility of the actions carried out within the framework of the Associative Project.
    • Public speaking and quality of reasoning.
    Terms and conditions :
    • Students must be members of an IGR-IAE association and have signed the IGR-IAE Rennes’ Charter of Associations.
    • Students who are members of an association are accompanied by a sponsor (teacher or administrative member of the IGR-IAE Rennes) whose objective is to provide advice for the implementation of the association’s Project.
    • Students who are members of an association have a storage space and collaborative information at their disposal (éMoodle de la vie associativeé) for their daily management and will have to deposit all the mandatory documents (administrative, grant application, minutes, files…)
    • Students who are members of an association must attend the various exchange periods provided for by the IGR-IAE:

        “Brainstorming Asso” (September)

        “Echang’Asso” (during the whole academic year)

        “Revel’Asso” (April)

        “Form’Asso” (April)

    Feedback

    The associations will have to produce various documents and an oral presentation:
    During the first semester, the emphasis is on the ability to build and write the Associative Project. It will be formalized by a written file.

    During the second semester, the focus is on the ability to communicate about the implementation of the Project and its evaluation through:

    An oral presentation (60% of the score) during the Revel’Asso day.
    This is exercise is similar to an ordinary general assembly of an association, which usually takes place as follows:
    President’s moral report: explain the project in broad terms and make future recommendations;
    Activity report: describe one or more actions that are essential for the achievement of the associative project;
    Financial report: brief presentation of the final budget with possible proposals regarding  the financial result (future project?)

    A written file (40% of the score) providing an analysis of the management project and recommendations for the following year.

    Assessment

    All associations are evaluated by a single teacher, who is not involved in supporting any association. This applies to the written reports of S1 and S2. The oral presentation is evaluated by a jury composed of funding partners and professionals from the associative sector. The expectations are presented to students at the beginning of S1 and S2 and are available on the Moodle of Associative Life.

    Objectifs

    Amener les élèves au niveau A1 ou A2 du CECRL (selon le niveau de départ):

    • Etre capable de se présenter
    • Etre capable de se déplacer en Chine
    Compétences à acquérir
    • Prioritairement l’oral : compréhension et expression
    • A l’écrit, l’accent est mis davantage sur :
    •  l’apprentissage des caractères les plus courants et leur culture associée.
    • Le pinyin (phonétique chinoise)
    Programme
    • Se présenter en chinois (identité, loisirs, activités quotidiennes, modes de déplacement…)
    • Comprendre un de leur camarade lorsqu’il se présente en chinois et le présenter à leur tour.
    Bibliographie

    Les cours sont préparés et distribués par l’enseignant (textes, fiches d’écriture, fichiers audio…).

    Des informations plus précises sont données en cours d’année au fur et à mesure des apprentissages (sites internet utiles, applications de dictionnaires, films…)

    Pré-requis

    Aucun

    Objectives

    General  objective: Get an overview of the project management domain

    Skills to be acquired

    At the end of the course the student will
    •    Understand the differences between project management and general management ;
    •    Understand the different Project Management knowledge areas and the process groups

    At the end of the course the student will be in a position to apply the project management concepts to simple projects

    Program

    Day 1
    – Course objectives and outlines
    – What is a project
    – What is project management ?
    – Knowledge Areas and Process groups
    – Phases versus Process Groups
    – Project initiating
    Day 2
    – Scope Management
    – Logical Framework
    – Analysis of the Environment
    – Work Breakdown Structure
    – Project Organization
    – Schedule management (basics)
    Day 3
    – Planning the Schedule
    – Cost Estimates and Budgeting
    – Risk Analysis
    – Communication Management
    – Project Governance
    Day 4
    – Monitoring and Controlling
    – Project Baselines
    – Change Management
    – Project Teams
    – Agile
    – Closing the Project
    – Common Mistakes

    Bibliography

    Project Management Institute. (2017). A Guide to the Project management Body of Knowledge (6e ed.).
    Gray, C. F., & Larson, E. W. (2010). Project Management: The Managerial Process (Fourth Edition ed.). Mc-Graw-Hill
    Kerzner, H. (2017). Project Management: A System Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling (12th ed.). Hoboken, John Wiley & Sons.
    Meredith, J. R., & Mantel, S. J. (2015).  Project Management: A Managerial Approach (9th ed.). Hoboken Wiley.

    Objectives

    The project consists in:
    •    solving a real business problem
    •    applying the acquired knowledge to entrusted missions
    •    reinforcing the training through the work with the company tutor

    Programme

    Proceedings:
    •    Starting: September
    •    Run: 9 teamwork sessions (2H/session) from Sep. to Jan.
    •    Presentation: January.
    Methods:
    •    Session reports
    •    Progress reports and final report
    •    Self-assessment

    Assessment: presentation

    Presentation: 
    •    Duration:
    •    30 minutes/group
    Board:
    •    Tutors
    •    IGR representatives
    •    Enterprise partners
    Proceedings:
    •    Project presentation
    •    Q&A
    •    Comments

    Evaluation criteria:
    •    Oral presentation: relevance, animation, timing
    •    Presentation of the project: objectives, planning, fulfillment, and analyses
    •    Group dynamics: task sharing, communication, decision making, conflict management.

    Objectives of the project

    Prepare students to build their professional project in order to promote their professional integration

    Skills to be acquired

    Knowledge of management positions

    Program

    Monday to Thursday (in November)

    Workshops from 8:30 am to 11:30 am

    Conferences from 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm

    Workshops from 2 pm to 5 pm

    Lectures from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm

    Friday: Business Forum

    Saturday: Recruitment Simulation Day (JSR)

    Bibliography

    None

    Prerequisites

    None

  • Objectives

    Identify and interpret the strategy of organizations

    Skills to be acquired

    Master the fundamentals of corporate strategy, understand the different strategic approaches, be able to make strategic decisions when faced with a corporate problem.

    Program

    1. Intro

    • Origins of the concept and definition
    • The strategic approach: role of the manager, mission and corporate positioning

    2. Strategic management

    • Structure and strategy
    • Strategic segmentation and DAS
    • Strategic decision making
    • Generic strategies

    3. Strategic external diagnosis

    • The Pestel
    • SWOT
    • The Porter’s forces
    • Blue Ocean strategy

    4. Internal strategic diagnosis

    • Strategic capacity: resources and skills, dynamic capacities
    • Business portfolio: BCG and McKinsey

    5. Strategic maneuvers

    • Growth paths and modes
    • Innovation
    • Internationalization
    Brief bibliography

    Strategor – All about business strategy, 7th edition, 2016

    Competitive advantage – How to stay ahead of the competition and maintain your lead, Michael Porter, 2003

    Managing for the future, Peter Drucker, 2013

    Blue Ocean Strategy, W. Chan Kim, Renee Mauborgne, 2015

    Possible prerequisites

    None

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Objectives

    The aim of the course is to make students knowledgeable about the main characteristics of global logistics networks’ design and control.

    Skills to be acquired

    The students will be able to (help) drive associated decision processes in actual industrial, distribution or service provision contexts.

    Program

    Supply chain design:

    • Role of the production/operations function and a supply chain in an organization
    • Production/operations management (POM) and supply chain management (SCM)
    • Major factors of production system and production management

    Supply chain control:

    • Inventory management
    • Production planning and control
    • Logistics decision models in SCM
    Bibliography
    • Bozarth, C.C. and Handfield, R.B., (2008). Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2nd ed., Pearson International Edition.
    • Russel, S.R. (2008). Operations and supply chain management, 6th International student edition Ed. , Published by John Wiley & Sons
    • Taylor, D. (2001). Manufacturing operations & supply chain management: lean approach, Int. Thomson Business Press
    Prerequisites

    Basic mathematical and business management background

    Objectives
    • to understand financial policy which is related to the objectives and the strategies (business model) of a firm
    • to study the great financial decisions for a firm, long term financial decisions : investment, financing and forecasts
    Skills to be acquired

    To be able to understand and communicate about financial problem

    Program

    I. INVESTMENT

    A. the cash-flows determination

        1. Initial period
        2. Intermediate periods
        3. Final period

    B. The discounted cash-flows problem

        1. WACC :  weight average cost of capital

    C. Profitability criterias

        1. Net present value
        2. Internal rate of return
        3. Profitability index
        4. Pay back period

    II. FINANCING

    A. Internal financing

        1. self financing
        2. Disposals of fixed assets

    B. External financing

        1. Capital increases
        2. Loans (banks/financial market/insurances)
        3. Hybrids
        4. Leasing

    III. FINANCIAL FORECASTS

    A. Recall of various financial forecasts

    B. Long term forecast : financial plan

    Bibliography

    R. PIKE, B. NEALE – «corporate finance and investment – decisions and strategies» – Prentice Hall 6 2006

    P. VERNIMMEN, P. QUIRY. Y. LE FUR  « corporate finance » Dalloz – 2015

    Objectives

    This module develops an understanding of the role of budgeting within an organization. It will enhance the ability to prepare, analyze, interpret, critically evaluate and use data for planning and control.
    It also develops an awareness of actual management accounting practice and an interest in emerging issues in management accounting.

    Skills to be acquired

    1. Define a budget and show how budgets, objectives and strategic plans are related.
    2. Explain the budgeting process and the interlinking of the various budgets within the business.
    3. Construct various budgets from relevant data.
    4. Discuss the criticisms that are made of budgeting.
    5. Undertake variance analysis and discuss possible reasons for the variances calculated.

    Program

    1. Budgeting

    • Budgets and budgeting process: nature and objectives of budgets, operating budget and master budget, link with strategy
    • Preparing a budget: the budget-setting process, the interrelationship of budgets, operating and master budgets
    • Current issues in budgeting: criticism of budgeting, rolling forecasts, activity-based budgeting (ABB), zero-based budgeting (ZBB), beyond budgeting

    2. Variance Analysis

    • Basic concepts
    • Level 1 analysis: Total variance
    • Level 2 analysis: Flexible budget variance and sales volume variance
    • Level 3 analysis: Sales price variance, price variances and efficiency variances for direct-cost inputs, fixed overhead costs variance
    • Reconciling the budgeted profit with the actual income

    3. Managing Working Capital

    • Definition of working capital
    • The cash conversion cycle
    • Inventory management

    Objectives

    The purpose of this course is to examine the  key concepts and strategic issues related to conducting marketing operations across borders. More specifically,  we will focus on identifying and evaluating international market opportunities,  developing international market entry strategies, and adapting the marketing mix to different market needs and constraints. As much as possible we will try to simulate a “real” business environment;  therefore a large portion of this course will consist in hands-on application exercises and discussions

    Skills to be acquired

    After taking this course students should be able to:
    •    Assess and prioritize international market opportunities, conduct deep market analysis and develop recommendations
    •    Develop market entry strategy
    •    Be aware of common pitfalls, specific to the international field
    •    Have a better awareness of foreign cultures and, business practices
    •    Develop and implement global marketing mix strategies

    Program

    Topic 1:  Introduction to globalization
    -Global marketing or international marketing? Born global.
    – Pros and cons of international expansion
    –  Intercultural issues and how to build cross-cultural awareness
    Topic 2: Market opportunity research
    -How to identify and evaluate international opportunities?
    -Where to find information?
    -How to prioritize international markets?
    – Evaluate risks and potential ROI
    Topic 3: Market entry strategy
    -Build, buy, partner? Developing a distribution network
    -International sales negotiations
    – Global segmentation and positioning
    – Legal, tax and logistical issues
    -Developing financial projections and budget
    Topic 4:  Standardization versus localization
    -Brand and product decisions
    -Pricing
    Topic 5: Standardization versus localization (To continue)
    -Communication
    -e-commerce: building effective global websites

    Bibliography

    Kotabe M., Helsen K. (2017). Global Marketing Management (7th edition). Wiley.
    Kotabe, M., & Helsen, K. (2009). The SAGE handbook of international marketing. Los Angeles: SAGE. (Available as ebook)
    De Mooij, M. (1998). Global marketing and advertising, understanding cultural paradoxes. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
    Breaking into the trade game, A small business guide To exporting (2005). 3rd edition. Small Business Administration.

    Objectives

    At the end of the course, participants will be able to understand the influence of culture on their own behavior and the behavior of their colleagues at work, and to create a common understanding of work and communication. Identify the effects of culture in communication (verbal and non-verbal). Train oneself to adapt to intercultural situations and to have a reflexive view and posture. To deduce the appropriate intercultural managerial behaviors.

    Pedagogical methods

    The pedagogical approach of the seminars is dynamic and diversified (theoretical courses, workshops, role-playing, theatrical techniques). A situation-based approach allows for a conceptual and reflexive understanding of the experience. During these seminars, we maintain a constant interaction between a theoretical framework, experiential workshops and an analysis of professional practice (APP) or REX.

    Program

    Day 1: 7 hours

    Methods: Theoretical course, group work, use of the “meta” perspective, problem solving.
    Presentation of the objectives of the seminar. – the purpose of the seminar.
    Implementation of an international working practice as a professional experiential tool.
    Identification of our own cultural identity: individual, regional, national. What are your cultural orientations in France and in the other countries participating in the course?
    Intercultural Training Exercise: What Do They Need To Know About Us?
    Do we have Common Cultural Dimensions with China, Brazil, Portugal, Spain, Italy, South-Africa, Indonesia, Poland etc
    Lecture: culture, cultural phenomenon, cultural dimensions (Hofstede) and social representations, ethnocentricism and ethnorelativism (Levi-Strauss).

    Day 2: 7 hours

    Methods: Theory course, group work, use of the “meta” perspective, problem solving. APP.
    Theoretical course: Non-verbal communication: Integrating the meaning, importance and reading of non-verbal elements that intervene in professional intercultural situations (proxemics, paralanguage, kinetic language).
    Exercise: Presentation of the students’ different intercultural non-verbal communication practices.
    Professional Practice Analysis of an Intercultural Management issue.

    Day 3: 6 hours

    Methods: Theoretical course, group work, use of the “meta” perspective, problem solving.
    Theoretical course: Emotional Intelligence: Integrating the meaning, importance and emotional regulation that occur in professional intercultural situations
    Intercultural Training Exercise: Cross-Cultural Checklist
    Oral presentations by the students.

    Bibliography

    1. Coaching across Cultures, Philippe Rosinski 2003.

    2. The Hidden Dimension, HALL,E, Paris, Seuil, 1966,

    3. Non-verbal and para-verbal communication. HENNEL-BRZOZOWSKA Agnieszka Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland-Synergies Pologne n°5 – 2008 pp. 21-30, 2008.

    4. La Mise en scène de la vie quotidienne, t. 1 La Présentation de soi, GOFFMAN, Irving. Éditions de Minuit, coll. ” Le Sens Commun “, 1973.

    5. Living and working in France, Geneviève Brame – Kogan Page 2004.
    6. We Europeans, Richard Hill – Europublic 1992.
    7. Cultures and Organisations, Geert Hofstede – McGraw-Hill book company 1991.
    8. Le Manager Global – Comment piloter une équipe Multiculturelle DUNOD 2004.
    9. Mind your Manners, Managing Business cultures in the new global Europe, John Mole, Nicholas Brealey Publishing 2004.
    10. Culture et mondialisation, Philippe d’Iribarne – Editions du Seuil 2001.
    11. Managing a Multicultural Team – ESF editeur 2004.
    12. Euro Managers and Martians, Richard Hill – Europublic 1992.
    13. Commerce entre cultures, Jean-Claude Usunier – Editions PUF 1992.

    Objectives

    The aim of the course is to learn
    –    How do we as leaders convene strategic conversations that enable us to support our work in organizations and communities?
    –   How do we understand difference as an asset from which we all can grow?

    Skills to be acquired

    The students will be able

    1.    To speak with intention: noting what has relevance to the conversation in the moment.
    2.    To listen with attention: respectful of the learning process for all members of the group.
    3.    To tend the well-being of the circle: remaining aware of the impact of our contributions.

    Program

    Concepts presentation and discussions on
    Worldview Intelligence and the Art of Participatory Leadership
    A participative approach for leading, convening and engaging

    Prerequisites

    Academic and MBA personal experience

    Objectifs

    The goal is to broaden the students’ knowledge and mastery of English by studying concepts related to their field, such as Innovation, Company Law, Branding, Recruiting and PR.

    Compétences à acquérir

    The students will be expected to carry out analyses of business documents, articles, and audio-visual documents and share ideas in workshops, present their ideas and report on them.

    Programme

    Setting up a company in the USA:

    First term (Semestre 1)

    1. Innovation: conceive a new product/service
    2.  Company Law: choose the best business structure
    3. Branding: develop your strategy
    Bibliographie

    For grammar references:

    Advanced Grammar in Use, Martin Hewings, Cambridge University Press, third edition (book, ebook or app available)

    Pré-requis

    CEFR Levels: B2-C1

    1 cours au choix parmi :

    – Espagnol

    – Espagnol approfondi

    – Allemand

    – Chinois débutant

     

    Espagnol

    Objectifs

    Prise de parole fluide, sans lecture (support fiche/plan autorisé).

    Appropriation et argumentation des thèmes abordés.

    Savoir participer à un débat, proposer des situations en lien avec le thème traité.

    Maîtrise des temps du passé. Renforcement des bases grammaticales ;

    Connaissance du cinéma d’Espagne et d’Amérique latine (argentin/chilien)

    Compétences à acquérir

    Oral en continu et en interaction.
    Compréhension de l’écrit et de l’oral.

    Vocabulaire/expression du champ lexical des thèmes culturels abordés et répliques de l’interaction.

    Savoir proposer et défendre un projet dans un contexte donné, une actualité donnée.

    Programme

    Les caractéristiques et spécificités culturelles dans la vie quotidienne et l’entreprise. Cas de IBERDROLA ; changement d’horaires.

    Marketing politique, cas d’entreprises en Amérique latine.

    Campagnes, affiches d’entreprises et/ ou d’ONG.

    Spécificités de la langue espagnol (données de l’institut Cervantes)

    La Ruta Quetzal

    En fonction de l’actualité : salons/ polémiques/expos/conférences.

    Echanges avec le groupe avancé, en milieu de semestre sur la création d’entreprise. Vote pour le meilleur projet.

    Bibliographie

    Compréhension de l’écrit :

    El País / Público.es / capital / bbc espagnol

    Compréhension de l’oral :

    Audiolingua/radialistas,net/rtve.es

    Expression écrite : ver-taal/gram@clicando/larouss,fr/ wordreference

    Pré-requis

    B1 à B2

     

    Espagnol approfondi

    Programme

    Contenu thématique

    Semestre 1 – Búsqueda de empleo y la contratación de personal : préparation de CV, de lettres de motivation et d’entretiens d’embauche en espagnol

    Semestre 2 – Negociación y Manejo de crisis: Études de cas professionnels et de l’actualité du monde de l’entreprise de l’aire culturelle hispanophone

    Contenu linguistique et supports

    Semestre 1 – Búsqueda de empleo y la contratación de personal : études de documents (supports papier, audio, vidéo, en ligne…) pour connaître les règles de présentation d’une petite annonce, d’un CV et d’une lettre de motivation en espagnol. Rédaction des documents dans le respect de ces règles. Jeux de rôles, type cabinet de conseil en recherche d’emploi. Études de documents (supports papier, audio, vidéo, en ligne…) pour connaître la façon dont se déroule un entretien, puis simulations d’entretiens.

    Semestre 2 – negociación y manejo de crisis: étude et présentation d’articles (compréhension écrite et expression orale en continu), étude et présentation de sujets sur support audio et/ou vidéo (compréhension orale et expression orale en continu), débats et mises en situation autour de ces thèmes (expression orale en interaction), rédaction de synthèse de documents et de communiqués de presse.

    Travaux individuels et travaux de groupes.

    Bibliographie

    Donnée par l’enseignant.

    Pré-requis

    B1 à B2

    Allemand

    Programme

    Les acteurs dans l’économie

    L’argent

    – homo oeconomicus

    – riche/pauvre, le revenu, le bonheur

    – vivre sans argent

    La publicité

    – comment ça marche ?

    – « neuro marketing »

    La génération Y et les implications pour le monde du travail

    – de nouvelles formes de travail

    – postuler pour un emploi

    Jeu de rôle

    – « hire or fire », droit du travail

    – « corporate citizenship »

    Fair trade

    – développement durable

    – mode (fair wear)

    Oraux interactifs en S2 sur des sujets imposés

    Bibliographie

    Transmise par l’enseignant au premier TD.

     

    Chinois

    Objectifs

    Amener les élèves au niveau A1 ou A2 du CECRL (selon le niveau de départ):

    • Etre capable de se présenter
    • Etre capable de se déplacer en Chine
    Compétences à acquérir
    • Prioritairement l’oral : compréhension et expression
    • A l’écrit, l’accent est mis davantage sur :
    •  l’apprentissage des caractères les plus courants et leur culture associée.
    • Le pinyin (phonétique chinoise)
    Programme
    • Se présenter en chinois (identité, loisirs, activités quotidiennes, modes de déplacement…)
    • Comprendre un de leur camarade lorsqu’il se présente en chinois et le présenter à leur tour.
    Bibliographie

    Les cours sont préparés et distribués par l’enseignant (textes, fiches d’écriture, fichiers audio…).

    Des informations plus précises sont données en cours d’année au fur et à mesure des apprentissages (sites internet utiles, applications de dictionnaires, films…)

    Pré-requis

    Aucun

    OBJECTIVES :

    – Open your horizon to management culture and cultural studies
    – Work on your oral and written feedback skills

    TERMS AND CONDITIONS

    – The student must attend at least one conference per semester at IGR-IAE and participate in at least one event  outside IGR (exhibition, play, conference)
    – The conference program at IGR-IAE will be announced at the end of September
    – For the event outside IGR, the student is free to organize his search, registration and participation (note: many events / conferences are free of charge. Check the  websites of the city of Rennes, the tourist office, the city of science etc.)

    FEEDBACK

    – by groups of two students (no more, no less)
    o A 180-second video to present the event attended and its historical, political or cultural background (contextualization of your reflection).
    o A 2-page summary, offering a critical and analytical reading (political, social, philosophical) of the external event
    o A 2-page synthesis offering a critical and analytical reading (political, social, philosophical) of the IGR-IAE conference(s)

    ASSESSMENT

    – Quality of the form of the feedback:
    dynamism, originality, ability to draw attention, quality of writing and richness of vocabulary (spoken and written), careful presentation: video editing, readability, layout, spelling of written work, etc.

    – General organization :
    introduction containing a catchphrase and the announcement of a relevant and structured plan, balance between the different parts of the announced plan, ideas classified in a logical and clear order, neat and synthetic  conclusion.

    – Quality of the contents:
    understanding the subject matter and the restitution of essential ideas, synthesis and clarity, critical thinking, analytical skills, ancillary research that has deepened the subject

    Objectives

    The “Associative Project Management” option is an opportunity for students to put into practice all the theoretical knowledge covered during their studies and also to acquire new skills:

    • Introduction to the Associative Project and particularity of the associative environment.
    • Application of theoretical knowledge: Strategy, Finance, Team Management, Communication, Project Management.
    • Formalization and intelligibility of the actions carried out within the framework of the Associative Project.
    • Public speaking and quality of reasoning.
    Terms and conditions :
    • Students must be members of an IGR-IAE association and have signed the IGR-IAE Rennes’ Charter of Associations.
    • Students who are members of an association are accompanied by a sponsor (teacher or administrative member of the IGR-IAE Rennes) whose objective is to provide advice for the implementation of the association’s Project.
    • Students who are members of an association have a storage space and collaborative information at their disposal (éMoodle de la vie associativeé) for their daily management and will have to deposit all the mandatory documents (administrative, grant application, minutes, files…)
    • Students who are members of an association must attend the various exchange periods provided for by the IGR-IAE:

        “Brainstorming Asso” (September)

        “Echang’Asso” (during the whole academic year)

        “Revel’Asso” (April)

        “Form’Asso” (April)

    Feedback

    The associations will have to produce various documents and an oral presentation:
    During the first semester, the emphasis is on the ability to build and write the Associative Project. It will be formalized by a written file.

    During the second semester, the focus is on the ability to communicate about the implementation of the Project and its evaluation through:

    An oral presentation (60% of the score) during the Revel’Asso day.
    This is exercise is similar to an ordinary general assembly of an association, which usually takes place as follows:
    President’s moral report: explain the project in broad terms and make future recommendations;
    Activity report: describe one or more actions that are essential for the achievement of the associative project;
    Financial report: brief presentation of the final budget with possible proposals regarding  the financial result (future project?)

    A written file (40% of the score) providing an analysis of the management project and recommendations for the following year.

    Assessment

    All associations are evaluated by a single teacher, who is not involved in supporting any association. This applies to the written reports of S1 and S2. The oral presentation is evaluated by a jury composed of funding partners and professionals from the associative sector. The expectations are presented to students at the beginning of S1 and S2 and are available on the Moodle of Associative Life.

     Objectives of the project

    The purpose of this course is to train students in the information system and databases so that they are able to:

    • Master and methodologically develop the essential functionalities of Excel, Access and MYSQL.
    • Be able to perform calculations and use functions in Excel.
    • Adopt tools adapted to your daily life to simplify your activity.
    • Learn how to manage the database.
    • Be able to perform calculations and use SQL queries.
    Skills to be acquired

    Management and analysis of company data using computer tools.

    Program
    1.  Excel spreadsheet
    • Perform mathematical operations using formulas and functions
    • Format and layout the data and results obtained
    • Represent data in graphical and dynamic tabular form
    • Create and manipulate dynamic tables and graphs
    • Sort or filter data
    • Enter and modify data according to validation rules
    • Protect and create models
    • Create macros
    • Data extraction and transformation with Power Query
    • Data presentation with Power Maps
    1.  Access database
    • Become familiar with the software environment (table, form, query, report)
    • Enter and update data (additions, changes, deletions)
    • Query the database and use the data
    • Create and adapt simple reports (labels).
    1.  SQL and DBMS MYSQL :
    • Detailed study of the SQL query language
    • Study of the Open Source Database Management System (DBMS) MySQL
    • Objects handled: tables, SQL queries
    • Table handling operations via PHPMyAdmin
    • Study of the SQL capabilities of the MySQL DBMS
    • Data export/import operations via the usual formats (CSV flows, fixed width flows, Excel format, etc.)
    • Coupling between Microsoft Access (Front-Office) and MySQL (Back-Office) DBMS and DBMS with presentation of the concepts of tables linked or imported under Microsoft Access.
    Bibliography

    None

    Prerequisites

    Knowledge of the Windows environment or equivalent.

    Objectives

    The aim of the course is to master the global strategy of a company

    Skills to be acquired

    The students will be able to make decisions in order to optimize a company activities (market share, production, profitability…)

    Program

    Simulation game

    Bibliography

    Management books

    Prerequisites

    None

    Objectives

    This is an action training program, “learning by doing”. In one week, each group of students must create a fictional company. Conferences are organized and referent teachers and professionals assist them. They present their project to a jury of professionals (business leaders, creative consultants, chamber of commerce, the Student Pole for Innovation, Transfer and Entrepreneurship …) and teachers. The company must meet all the conditions to be created. The seminar is based on learning by doing, the students are actors of the company creation

    Skills to be acquired
    • Theoretical knowledge: knowing and understanding entrepreneurship tools and techniques
    • Be able to apply it by creating a fictitious business project
    • Be able to explain your project to professionals
    Program

    The program is divided into five main phases..

    Discovery of the business creation Participation in the Regional Business Creation Days, EDO annual meetings, October, Rennes. This is a prerequisite.

    They discover actors and networks and attend conferences

    Courses and Conferences

     

    One month before the simulation, they receive theoretical lessons where tools are explained to them.

    This program is an application of the courses given throughout the degree: project management, accounting, marketing, strategy, finance, law…..

    Search for the idea
    LINK TO THE MARKETING COURSE
    They think about innovative concepts.

    They must do research, brainstorming and can debrief these materials with an innovation professional and a teacher, in order to validate or not the ideas.

    It is a time of maturation.

    Creation Week

     

    April

    This is the simulation in project management. They have one week to create. They are surrounded by professionals and considered as true creators. They have appointments with many councils  and teachers.
    Jury

    One week later

    April

    Presentation of the business plan

    Visit of the teams’ stands

    Bibliography

    Agence France Entrepreneur (AFE), Créer ou reprendre une entreprise, Les Éditions d’organisation.

    FAYOLLE : entrepreneuriat, Dunod, 2ème édition, 2012

    DELENGAIGNEDELENGAIGNE La Boîte à outils du Mind Mapping,  La Boîte à Outils, Dunod

    2016

    LEFEBVRE, F., La pratique de la création d’entreprise, juridique. Fiscal. Social .comptable.

    Léger-Jarniou C.,Entrepreneuriat, 2013.

    LEGER-JARNIOU,  KALOUSIS, La boite à outils de la création d’entreprise, Dunod

    LEGER-JARNIOUCERTHOUXDEGEORGELAMETALe Goff, Entrepreneuriat, Openbook, Dunod, 2016

    PAPIN, R., Stratégie pour la création d’entreprise, Création- Reprise – Développement, 6e édition, Dunod.

    PENDELIAU, G., Le profil du créateur d’entreprise, L’Harmattan.

    RIES, Lean Startup : Adoptez l’innovation continue, PEARSON, 2015

    SILBERZAHN : Créateur, ne fuyez pas !

    TSAGLIOTIS, Start-up attitude, Dunod, 2017

    Prerequisites

    Knowledge in:
    -Marketing,
    – Accounting – Accounting
    – Law
    – Finance
    -HR

    – Make the connection between courses and corporate life

    – Acquire both technical and social skills (know-how and interpersonal skills in the workplace).

    – Know how to place one’s missions at the heart of the company’s strategy or a managerial issue

    – Confirm or reverse one’s professional orientation.

 

Prerequisites

To qualify, applicants can have the following background (first 2 years of the Bachelor’s):

– IUT GEA (Business and Administration Management) or TC (Marketing Techniques)
– Faculty of Economics (Bachelor’s Degree in Economics Management)
–  CPGE (preparatory classes to “grandes écoles”)
or other courses according to your profile (including Applied Foreign Languages, specific course abroad, or double degree agreement with your home university).

Selective access

Hold the first 120 credits (Bac +2) + IAE-Message score.

Testimonials

A few words from our IGR Students

Nous Contacter

Contact Us