Course in English for exchange students

IGR-IAE Rennes offers a full program in management for non-French speaking exchange students, thus allowing students from all our partner universities to have a study experience in Rennes. These management courses are free of charge for exchange students.

International

Objectives

In this program, exchange students can choose from a wide range of courses in various fields of management: finance, management control, human resources, and marketing. Moreover, the program particularly gives students more knowledge about France, its language and culture. This is also an opportunity to meet new friends and broaden their horizons. 

With the exchange program, students will get a good chance to develop a global perspective!

international

Program

This program represents 30 credits per semester (European standards), with 4 credits per course.

Classes are taught at Bachelor 3 or at Master 1 level. In the description below, Bachelor 3 courses are marked as level 3 and Master 1 courses are marked as level 4.
In the online course selection form (to be received from the incoming student coordinator), level 3 or level 4 students will be open to you depending on your academic level. 

 

Semester 1

Objectives

This module develops an understanding of issues related to the elements of costs and costs systems. It develops abilities to prepare, analyze and interpret accounting information on cost elements in various cost systems.
It also introduces them to the techniques that management accountants use to assist managers in their decision-making tasks and to evaluate performance.

Skills to be acquired

1.    Outline issues relating to product costs and cost systems
2.    Describe the role and uses of different types of cost systems
3.    Select appropriate methods for costing elements of cost (e.g. labour, materials and overhead) into products or services
4.    Select and apply cost systems appropriate to the decision

Program

An introduction to management accounting

1.    Basic concepts of cost accounting
        • Costs and cost objects
        •  Two classifications
2.    Full absorption costing
        • Basic concepts
        • Full costing in multi-product/service businesses
        • Going further
3.    Partial costing and CVP
        • Cost-volume-profit analysis: Variable cost, contribution margin, break-even point (BEP), operating
           gearing
         • Relevant cost and marginal analysis
         • Going further
4.    Cost relevance
        • Using costs to assess past performance, inventories valuation and budgeting
        • Using costs to make specific types of decisions: make or buy, sell or process further, continue or close
           down, pricing and special order decisions, product mix decisions when capacity constraints exist

Bibliography

Atrill P. et McLaney E. (2009). Management Accounting for Decision Makers, Pearson Education.
Horngren C.T., Datar S. et Rajan M. (2015). Cost accounting: A managerial emphasis 15th edition, Pearson Education.

Prerequisites

None

Assessment method

Written exam 1,5h

Apogée code

GLIB542T

Objectives

General  objective: Get an overview of the project management domain

Skills to be acquired
 
At the end of the course the student will
•    Understand the differences between project management and general management ;
•    Understand the different Project Management knowledge areas and the process groups
 

At the end of the course the student will be in a position to apply the project management concepts to simple projects

Program

Day 1
– Course objectives and outlines
– What is a project
– What is project management ?
– Knowledge Areas and Process groups
– Phases versus Process Groups
– Project initiating
Day 2
– Scope Management
– Logical Framework
– Analysis of the Environment
– Work Breakdown Structure
– Project Organization
– Schedule management (basics)
Day 3
– Planning the Schedule
– Cost Estimates and Budgeting
– Risk Analysis
– Communication Management
– Project Governance
Day 4
– Monitoring and Controlling
– Project Baselines
– Change Management
– Project Teams
– Agile
– Closing the Project
– Common Mistakes

Bibliography

Project Management Institute. (2017). A Guide to the Project management Body of Knowledge (6e ed.).
Gray, C. F., & Larson, E. W. (2010). Project Management: The Managerial Process (Fourth Edition ed.). Mc-Graw-Hill
Kerzner, H. (2017). Project Management: A System Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling (12th ed.). Hoboken, John Wiley & Sons.
Meredith, J. R., & Mantel, S. J. (2015).  Project Management: A Managerial Approach (9th ed.). Hoboken Wiley.

Apogée code

GLIB504T

Objectives
To understand the institutional functioning of the European Union as well as the various European policies, which are implemented in the Member States.
To focus on the economic and monetary policies, solidarity and innovation.
To strengthen the methodology of the students.
To develop a general understanding of the EU for better career opportunities.
Skills to be acquired
Students should be able to acquire basic knowledge on the dynamics and roles of the european institutions, and develop and analyse it through current affairs.
Program
1.    The European Union, an historical construction
2.    The European Union, a political project
3.    The EU, an institutional architecture (Lisbon Treaty)
 
PART 1: The Working of the European Union
Chapter 1: the institutions of the EU
Chapter 2: other institutions of the European Union
PART 2: European Law and Finances
Chapter 1 : European legal system
Chapter 2 : European Finances
 
Bibliography
 
The bibliography below covers key materials but is by no means exhaustive.
–    Primary sources: Eur-lex http://eur-lex.europa.eu/en/ and European Union website http://europa.eu (direct, free access to all EU documents and legislation, press releases and different other sources).
–    Secondary sources:  textbooks, academic journals, etc.
–    Bomber, E. & Stubb, A. (2008). The European Union: How Does It Work? Oxford, Oxford University Press.
–    McCormick, J. (2008). Understanding the European Union. A Concise Introduction, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan.
–    Press: The Financial Times offers excellent coverage of European affairs.
Prerequisites

Students should have a general knowledge and they should be interested in current affairs.

Apogée code
 
GLIB632T
Objectives

The main objective is to propose tools and methods to assess the overall financial health of companies. Based on an analysis of the risk, performance and profitability of a company in order to make decisions.  

Skills to be acquired
  • Be able to implement many financial ratios and traditional indicators in function of the financial question

  • Analyze the figures in order to conclude about the financial health of a business

Program

Introduction:  What is financial diagnosis?
Section 1: Remind about financial statements
Section 2: Analyzing of growth and profit

Section 3: Evaluating Cash-flow
Section 4: Balance sheet analysis

Bibliography
  • P. Vernimmen., 2012, “Corporate finance”. Dalloz
  • R. Pike., B. Neale., & P. Linsley., 2012. “Corporate finance and investment”. Pearson
  • J. BERK, P. DEMARZO – « corporate finance » Pearson International Edition – 2007
Prerequisites

Accounting knowledge (balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement)

Apogée code
 
GLIB502T
Objectives

To understand the main concepts and levers a marketing executive may activate to embody the positioning and stimulate the sales of a product/service (mainly on short-termed perspective) through 4P policies.

Skills to be acquired

Be able to examine basic marketing strategies (STP approach) and primarily identify, understand and criticize marketing policies.

Program

Chapter 1: Segmentation, targeting and positioning
Chapter 2: Product policy and portfolio management
Chapter 3: Retailing
Chapter 4: Pricing
Chapter 5: Product promotion

Bibliography

Kotler, P., Keller, K. L., Armstrong, G., Armstrong, G., & Keller, K. (2016). Marketing Management, 15th global edition. England: Pearson Educationn Limited.

Prerequisites

None

Assessment method

Written exam 2h + project

Apogée code
 
GLIB522T
Objectives
  • To know what is and means HRM, HRD, Organization
  • To do the link between Organizations and HRM contingency
Skills to be acquired

HRM bases for beginners

Program
  1. What is HRM ? Differences between HRM and HR development
  2. Case Study : the Bio case
  3. What is an organization ?
  4. Organizations and HRM contingency
  5. Case Study on a topic (motivation, commitment, indentification & managerial insights)
Bibliography

Given for each chapter, during the course

Prerequisites

No

Apogée code
 
GLIB512T
Objectives

To understand the contribution of neuroscience to the study of consumer behavior

Program

General Introduction (2 Lectures)
Lecture 1: Introducing the contributions of neurosciences to Marketing
Lecture 2: The experimental approach: principles, qualitative and quantitative methods (focus on Neuroscientific Methods: FMRI, Eye-tracking, EEG, etc.)
Marketing & consumers’ Psychology (2 Lectures)
Lecture 3: Needs and motivations
Lecture 4: Cognitions and behaviors
Consumers’ evaluations and responses to marketing actions (from strategy to mix marketing decisions)
Lecture 5: Marketing (neuro) strategy: segmenting, targeting customers and positioning 
Lecture 6: Implementing the marketing (neuro) strategy on the field
– Part 1 Focus on branding
– Part 2 Focus on product policy
– Part 3 Focus on retailing
– Part 4 Focus on communication policy
These lectures will be mixed with applications

Bibliography

– Droulers, O., & Roullet, B. (2014). Violent television program and ad memory: Respective roles of violence intensity and narrativity. Recherche et Applications en Marketing (English Edition), 29(1), 55-71.
– Droulers, O., Gallopel-Morvan, K., Lacoste-Badie, S., & Lajante, M. (2017). The influence of threatening visual warnings on tobacco packaging: Measuring the impact of threat level, image size, and type of pack through psychophysiological and self-report methods. PloS one, 12(9), e0184415.
– Lajante, M., Droulers, O., & Amarantini, D. (2017). How Reliable Are “State-of-the-Art” Facial EMG Processing Methods?: Guidelines for Improving the Assessment Of Emotional Valence in Advertising Research. Journal of Advertising Research, 57(1), 28-37.
– Adil, S., Lacoste-Badie, S., & Droulers, O. (2018). Face Presence and Gaze Direction In Print Advertisements: How They Influence Consumer Responses: An Eye-Tracking Study. Journal of Advertising Research, in presse
– Gorn, G. J. (1982). The effects of music in advertising on choice behavior: A classical conditioning approach. The Journal of Marketing, 94-101.
– Ariely, D., & Berns, G. (2010). Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business. Nature reviews neuroscience, 11(4), 284-292.
– Stoll, M., Baecke, S., & Kenning, P. (2008). What they see is what they get? An fMRI-study on neural correlates of attractive packaging. Journal of Consumer Behaviour, 7(4-5), 342-359.
– Langleben, D. et al. (2009). Reduced prefrontal and temporal processing and recall of high “sensation value” ads. Neuroimage, 46(1), 219-225.
– Hutton, S. & Nolte, S. (2011). The effect of gaze cues on attention to print advertisements. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 25(6), 887-892.
– Sajjacholapunt, P., & Ball, L. (2014). The influence of banner advertisements on attention and memory: human faces with averted gaze can enhance advertising effectiveness. Frontiers in psychology, 5.

Prerequisites

No

Assessment method

Group Project
– Critical analysis of academic journal articles or/and elaboration of proposal of an experimental plan to solution a marketing problem
– Students are randomly assigned to a group of 3 or 4 students for this (or these) project(s)

Individual grade based on students’ level of engagement during the lectures:
– Participation and quality of interventions during the lectures
– Ability to repeat course material (seen in previous sessions, from the proposed bibliography),
– Punctuality,
– Attendance,
– Etc.

Apogée code
 
GLIB502T
Objectives

Preparation for CFA level 1

Skills to be acquired

In-depth knowledge of finance

Program

▪ Ethical and Professional Standards
▪ Quantitative Methods
▪ Financial Statement Analysis
▪ Economics
▪ Derivatives Investments
▪ Alternative Investments

Bibliography

Réussir le CFA level 1, Cours et Exercices, By Norberto Cordisco Respighi and Christine Verpeaux, Barchen

Prerequisites

L3 SGM / M1 Finance

Evaluation method

Quiz.

Apogée code
 
GFIN742T
Objectives
  • to discover the European Union framework for collective bargaining
  • to learn theories of negotiation applied to social negotiation
  • to  acquire a first experience  of a negotiation  thanks to a negotiation simulation
Skills to be acquired
At the end of the course, student
  • is aware of the philosophy and framework for employee participation in European Union
  • can recognize the different styles and strategies of negotiations
  • is able to build a strategy of negotiation  / to participate in a social negotiation
  • know his/her skills and abilities as a negotiator
Program
1.  The European Union framework :
–    the role of employee participation in European countries
–    the organisation of participation at European level
–    the organisation and weigh of Unions in European countries
2.  Negotiation theories :
–    Definition of negotiation   –  Interest and positions   – Best alternative to a negotiated agreement
–    Strategies of negotiation : cooperative/competitive
–    Preparation of a negotiation : information gathering, strategy choice
–    Management of communication and emotions
3.  Simulation of a social negotiation and debrief
(preparation outside the class, 8 hours simulation and debrief)
 
Apogée code
 
GRHI924U
Objectives

Learn about different financial markets and structure
Learn about equity, fixed income and derivative analysis and evaluation

Skills to be acquired

I. Market organization and structure
• Explain the main functions of the financial system.
• Describe classifications of assets and markets.
• Describe types of financial intermediaries and services.
• Define primary and secondary markets and explain how secondary markets support primary markets.

II. Equity
• Describe characteristics of types of equity securities.
• Explain the role of equity securities in the financing of a company’s assets.
• Distinguish between the market value and book value of equity securities.
• Compare the risk and return characteristics of types of equity securities.
• Evaluate whether a security, given its current market price and a value estimate, is overvalued, fairly valued, or undervalued by the market.
• Describe major categories of equity valuation models.
• Calculate the intrinsic value of a non-callable, nonconvertible preferred stock.

III. Fixed income
• Describe classifications of global fixed‐income markets.
• Describe the use of interbank offered rates as reference rates in floating‐rate debt.
• Describe mechanisms available for issuing bonds in primary markets.
• Calculate a bond’s price given a market discount rate.
• Describe credit risk and credit‐related risks affecting corporate bonds.
• Explain risks in relying on ratings from credit rating agencies.
• Calculate and interpret financial ratios used in credit analysis.
• Evaluate the credit quality of a corporate bond issuer and a bond of that issuer, given key financial ratios for the issuer and the industry.

IV. Derivatives
• Define a derivative and distinguish between exchange‐traded and over‐the‐counter derivatives.
• Contrast forward commitments and contingent claims.
• Define forward contracts, futures contracts, options (calls and puts), and swaps and credit derivatives, and compare their basic characteristics.
• Explain how the concepts of arbitrage, replication, and risk neutrality are used in pricing derivatives.
• Distinguish between value and price of forward and futures contracts.
• Explain how the value and price of a forward contract are determined at expiration, during the life of the contract, and at initiation.
• Explain why forward and futures prices differ.
• Explain how swap contracts are similar to but different from a series of forward contracts.
• Distinguish between the value and price of swaps.
• Explain how the value of a European option is determined at expiration.
• Identify the factors that determine the value of an option, and explain how each factor affects the value of an option.
• Explain put‐call parity for European options.
• Explain how the value of an option is determined using a one period binomial model.

Program

Chapter 1: Market organization and structure
Chapter 2: Equity analysis and evaluation
Chapter 3: Fixed income analysis and evaluation
Chapter 4: Derivatives analysis and evaluation

Bibliography

CFA programs: Kaplan Schweser notes, Wiley Study Guide, CFA Program Curriculum.
Pierre Vernimmen et al: Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice.
John C. Hull: Risk Management and Financial Institutions.
John C. Hull: Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives.

Prerequisites

Basics in mathematical and statistical tools (random variable, expectation, variance, covariance …)
Basic tools in finance and mathematical finance (present value, future value, discount rates, …)

Assessment method

Continuous assessment and project

Apogée code
 
G305100U
Objectives

This course aims to introduce the purchaser’s position and its role in the company.

Skills to be acquired

> Knowledge
This course aims to provide students with :
A good basic training in purchasing management
Theoretical foundations and practices
The necessary tools for each step of the purchasing cycle

> Know-how
Ability to analyze cases and situations, define and apply a purchasing strategy.

> Personal skills
Taking initiative and responsibility, working in groups.

Program

Course
Purchasing function in the company
The purchasing and supply professions
Managing the purchasing process
Mastering purchasing negotiations

Tutorials
Techniques for identifying needs and managing the purchasing process
Case studies

Prerequisites

Mastery of basic concepts in management science (strategy, marketing, logistics, etc.)

Apogée code
 
GMKT704T

These courses are given at CIREFE (Centre international rennais d’études de français pour étrangers) – Université de Rennes 2 – and organised by language level.

Semester 2

Objectives

to understand financial policy which is related to the objectives and the strategies (business model) of a firm to study the great financial decisions for a firm, long term financial decisions : investment, financing and forecasts

Skills to be acquired

To be able to understand and communicate about financial problem   

Program

I. INVESTMENT
A. the cash-flows determination

  • Initial period
  • Intermediate periods
  • Final period

B. The discounted cash-flows problem
WACC :  weight average cost of capital

C. Profitability criterias

  • Net present value
  • Internal rate of return
  • Profitability index
  • Pay back period

II. FINANCING
A. Internal financing

  • self financing
  • Disposals of fixed assets

B. External financing

  • Capital increases
  • Loans (banks/financial market/insurances)
  • Hybrids
  • Leasing

III. FINANCIAL FORECASTS
A. Recall of various financial forecasts
B. Long term forecast : financial plan

Bibliography

R. PIKE, B. NEALE – «corporate finance and investment – decisions and strategies» – Prentice Hall 6 2006
P. VERNIMMEN, P. QUIRY. Y. LE FUR  « corporate finance » Dalloz – 2015

Apogée code
 
GLIB621T
Objectives

To know how to identify and analyse corportate strategy. 

Skills to be acquired

Master the fundamentals on business strategy, understand the different strategic positions, be able to take strategic decisions in business situations.

Program

1.    Introduction
        a. Main definitions
        b. The strategic approach : leader’s role, mission & corporate positionning
2.    Strategic management
       a. Structure & strategy
       b. Strategic segmentation & Multibusiness companies
       c.  Strategic decision making
       d.  Generic strategies
3.    External diagnostic
       a. Pestel
       b. Swot
       c. Porter’s 5 forces
       d. Blue Ocean Strategy
4.    Internal Diagnostic
       a. Strategic capability : resources & competences, dynamic capabilities
       b. Activity portfolio : BCG et McKinsey
5.    Strategic directions
       a. Business development
       b. Innovation
c.    Internationalization

Bibliography

Strategor – Toute la stratégie d’entreprise, 7ème édition, 2016
L’avantage concurrentiel – Comment devancer ses concurrents et maintenir son avance, Michael Porter, 2003
Managing for the future, Peter Drucker, 2013
Blue Ocean Strategy, W. Chan Kim, Renee Mauborgne, 2015

Prerequisites

None

Apogée code
 
GLIB601T
Objectives

This module develops an understanding of the role of budgeting within an organization. It will enhance the ability to prepare, analyze, interpret, critically evaluate and use data for planning and control.
It also develops an awareness of actual management accounting practice and an interest in emerging issues in management accounting.

Skills to be acquired

1.    Define a budget and show how budgets, objectives and strategic plans are related.
2.    Explain the budgeting process and the interlinking of the various budgets within the business.
3.    Construct various budgets from relevant data.
4.    Discuss the criticisms that are made of budgeting.
5.    Undertake variance analysis and discuss possible reasons for the variances calculated.

Program

1.    Budgeting

  • Budgets and budgeting process: nature and objectives of budgets, operating budget and master budget,  link with strategy
  • Preparing a budget: the budget-setting process, the interrelationship of budgets, operating and master budgets
  • Current issues in budgeting: criticism of budgeting, rolling forecasts, activity-based budgeting (ABB), zero-based budgeting (ZBB), beyond budgeting

2.    Variance Analysis

  • Basic concepts
  • Level 1 analysis: Total variance
  • Level 2 analysis: Flexible budget variance and sales volume variance
  • Level 3 analysis: Sales price variance, price variances and efficiency variances for direct-cost inputs, fixed
  • overhead costs variance
  • Reconciling the budgeted profit with the actual income

3.    Managing Working Capital

  • Definition of working capital
  • The cash conversion cycle
  • Inventory management
Bibliography

Atrill P. et McLaney E. (2009). Management Accounting for Decision Makers, Pearson Education.
Horngren C.T., Datar S. et Rajan M. (2015). Cost accounting: A managerial emphasis 15th edition, Pearson Education.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge in financial accounting and cost calculation

Assessment method

Continuous assessment (online test +Written exam)

Apogée code
 
GLIB631T

Objectives

At the end of the course, participants will be able to understand the influence of culture on their own behavior and the behavior of their colleagues at work, and to create a common understanding of work and communication. Identify the effects of culture in communication (verbal and non-verbal). Train oneself to adapt to intercultural situations and to have a reflexive view and posture. To deduce the appropriate intercultural managerial behaviors.

Pedagogical methods

The pedagogical approach of the seminars is dynamic and diversified (theoretical courses, workshops, role-playing, theatrical techniques). A situation-based approach allows for a conceptual and reflexive understanding of the experience. During these seminars, we maintain a constant interaction between a theoretical framework, experiential workshops and an analysis of professional practice (APP) or REX.

Program

Day 1: 7 hours

Methods: Theoretical course, group work, use of the “meta” perspective, problem solving.
Presentation of the objectives of the seminar. – the purpose of the seminar.
Implementation of an international working practice as a professional experiential tool.
Identification of our own cultural identity: individual, regional, national. What are your cultural orientations in France and in the other countries participating in the course?
Intercultural Training Exercise: What Do They Need To Know About Us?
Do we have Common Cultural Dimensions with China, Brazil, Portugal, Spain, Italy, South-Africa, Indonesia, Poland etc
Lecture: culture, cultural phenomenon, cultural dimensions (Hofstede) and social representations, ethnocentricism and ethnorelativism (Levi-Strauss).

Day 2: 7 hours

Methods: Theory course, group work, use of the “meta” perspective, problem solving. APP.
Theoretical course: Non-verbal communication: Integrating the meaning, importance and reading of non-verbal elements that intervene in professional intercultural situations (proxemics, paralanguage, kinetic language).
Exercise: Presentation of the students’ different intercultural non-verbal communication practices.
Professional Practice Analysis of an Intercultural Management issue.

Day 3: 6 hours

Methods: Theoretical course, group work, use of the “meta” perspective, problem solving.
Theoretical course: Emotional Intelligence: Integrating the meaning, importance and emotional regulation that occur in professional intercultural situations
Intercultural Training Exercise: Cross-Cultural Checklist
Oral presentations by the students.

Bibliography

1. Coaching across Cultures, Philippe Rosinski 2003.

2. The Hidden Dimension, HALL,E, Paris, Seuil, 1966.

3. Non-verbal and para-verbal communication. HENNEL-BRZOZOWSKA Agnieszka Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland-Synergies Pologne n°5 – 2008 pp. 21-30, 2008.

4. La Mise en scène de la vie quotidienne, t. 1 La Présentation de soi, GOFFMAN, Irving. Éditions de Minuit, coll. ” Le Sens Commun “, 1973.

5. Living and working in France, Geneviève Brame – Kogan Page 2004.
6. We Europeans, Richard Hill – Europublic 1992.
7. Cultures and Organisations, Geert Hofstede – McGraw-Hill book company 1991.
8. Le Manager Global – Comment piloter une équipe Multiculturelle DUNOD 2004.
9. Mind your Manners, Managing Business cultures in the new global Europe, John Mole, Nicholas Brealey Publishing 2004.
10. Culture et mondialisation, Philippe d’Iribarne – Editions du Seuil 2001.
11. Managing a Multicultural Team – ESF editeur 2004.
12. Euro Managers and Martians, Richard Hill – Europublic 1992.
13. Commerce entre cultures, Jean-Claude Usunier – Editions PUF 1992.

Apogée code

GLIB612T

Objectives and skills to be acquired

The purpose of this course is to examine the  key concepts and strategic issues related to conducting marketing operations across borders. More specifically,  we will focus on identifying and evaluating international market opportunities,  developing international market entry strategies, and adapting the marketing mix to different market needs and constraints. As much as possible we will try to simulate a “real” business environment;  therefore a large portion of this course will consist in hands-on application exercises and discussions, After taking this course students should be able to:

  • Assess and prioritize international market opportunities, conduct deep market analysis and develop recommendations
  • Develop market entry strategy
  • Be aware of common pitfalls, specific to the international field
  • Have a better awareness of foreign cultures and, business practices
  • Develop and implement global marketing mix strategies
Program

Topic 1:  Introduction to globalization

– Global marketing or international marketing? Born global.
– Pros and cons of international expansion
– Intercultural issues and how to build cross-cultural awareness

Topic 2: Market opportunity research

-How to identify and evaluate international opportunities?
– Where to find information?
-How to prioritize international markets?
– Evaluate risks and potential ROI

Topic 3: Market entry strategy

-Build, buy, partner? Developing a distribution network
-International sales negotiations
– Global segmentation and positioning
– Legal, tax and logistical issues
– Developing financial projections and budget

Topic 4:  Standardization versus localization

– Brand and product decisions
-Pricing

Topic 5: Standardization versus localization (To continue)

-Communication
-e-commerce: building effective global websites

Bibliography

Kotabe M., Helsen K. (2017). Global Marketing Management (7th edition). Wiley.
Kotabe, M., & Helsen, K. (2009). The SAGE handbook of international marketing. Los Angeles: SAGE. (Available as ebook)
De Mooij, M. (1998). Global marketing and advertising, understanding cultural paradoxes. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
Breaking into the trade game, A small business guide To exporting (2005). 3rd edition. Small Business Administration.

Apogée code

GLIB602T

Objectives

The aim of the course is to make students knowledgeable about the main characteristics of global logistics networks’ design and control.

Skills to be acquired

The students will be able to (help) drive associated decision processes in actual industrial, distribution or service provision contexts.

Program

Supply chain design:

  • Role of the production/operations function and a supply chain in an organization
  • Production/operations management (POM) and supply chain management (SCM)
  • Major factors of production system and production management

Supply chain control:

  • Inventory management
  • Production planning and control
  • Logistics decision models in SCM
 
Bibliography
Bozarth, C.C. and Handfield, R.B., (2008). Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2nd ed., Pearson International Edition.
Russel, S.R. (2008). Operations and supply chain management, 6th International student edition Ed. , Published by John Wiley & Sons

Taylor, D. (2001). Manufacturing operations & supply chain management: lean approach, Int. Thomson Business Press

Prerequisites
 
Basic mathematical and business management background
 
Apogée code
GLIB611T
Brief

“The manager asks how and when. The leader asks what and why” (Warren Bennis)
In a nutshell, leadership is the ability to federate people in order to achieve a pre-defined strategy and objective. Management is the ability to carry out this objective on an operational level. 
Today however the distinction between leadership and management roles is certainly less apparent. 

Objectives

This module of 20 contact hours will enable students to become aware of and to develop their skills and abilities to apprehend a leadership management role in a fast-moving business environment.

Skills to be acquired

Students will be able to acquire and to develop the following skills: 

  1. To carry out a self-analysis (strengths, weaknesses, resources, needs, emotional intelligence)
  2. To develop active communication skills
  3. To create team dynamics
  4. To enhance decision-making skills
  5. To manage resistance and conflict
Program

Each session will be structured in the following way:

  1. Presentation of the concept 
  2. Illustration with self-analysis surveys, case studies and scenarios
  3. Practical simulations (individual or group exercise, role play, simulation, …)
Bibliography

Business-focused articles will be suggested for each topic.

For example:

  • Leadership styles (Mindtools)
  • The 7Cs of Communication (The Business Communication)
  • Bell and Hart’s Eight Causes of Conflict (Mindtools)
Prerequisites

None.

Assessment method

The continuous assessment method will be two-fold:
 Individual (50%): self-analysis report (leadership/management style)
 Group (50%): team simulation (4-5 students per team in function of the total number of students taking the module) 

Apogée code

GLIB622T

Skills to be acquired
  • Gaining competencies to reflect companies international business activities critically
  • Gaining decision-making-oriented competency (e.g., self-management)
  • Ability to evaluate complex, innovative situations as they are typical of companies international business activities

Program

•     Qualitative and quantitative trends in the international business environrnent
•     Modes of foreign market entry
•     Theoretical approaches for the explanation of different modes of foreign market entry
•     Strategies of international companies
•     Organization of international companies 1: archetypes of macro structures
•     Organization of International companies Il: Empirical studies referring to strategy and structure of international companies
•     Organization of International companies III: technocratic and person oriented coordination of international companies
•     Conceptual and methodological approaches to country culture

Teaching methods
 

Participants are expected contribute to the class through their comments, questions, and examples from their experience. Some readings may be assigned to supplement the in-class material. More specifically, the course will use the following teaching methods:

•     Lectures
•     Discussions of readings
•     In-class exercises and simulations

Bibliography

International Business: Environments and Operations (12th Edition) by John Daniels, Lee Radebaugh, Daniel Sullivan
International Business – Competing in the Global Marketplace – 6th Edition (2007) by Charles Hill
International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior by Nancy J. Adler and Allison Gundersen

Apogée code

GDPI022T

Objectives
This course aims to introduce students to the world of Non-Verbal Communication and its importance and effectiveness in intercultural relations. To this end, the course focuses on the following objectives (theoretical and practical)

THEORETICAL GOALS :

  1. to describe the service encounter as a cognitive and affective communication area, and
  2. to reflect on the dimensions of culture that are related to language (verbal and non-verbal)
  3. to define non-verbal communication and its important role in the service encounter
  4. to present the 5 dimensions of non-verbal communication and be able to identify them

PRACTICAL GOALS

  • to give some tools to be able to identify conflicts in non-verbal communication
  • to learn to identify specific imagery associated with colors, shapes, certain gestures, etc.
  • to understand, through examples, how global companies use non-verbal communication in their promotional activities
Skills to be acquired

THEORETICAL SKILLS

To know and be able to recognize the following concepts: service encounter, culture, non-verbal communication
Know and know how to differentiate the dimensions of non-verbal communication: Kinesics or body language; Proxemics; Morphopsychology; Paralanguage; Haptonomy
Knowing how to differentiate between “low context” and “high context” cultures

APPLIED SKILLS

Understand the importance of non-verbal communication in intercultural exchanges: know how certain gestures have a different or even opposite meaning depending on the culture

  • know how to interpret some gestures and distinguish between emblematic and illustrative gestures
  • be able to identify the attitude of our interlocutor according to the posture (“kinesiscs”), the tone of voice (paralanguage) and the “shaking hands” (haptonomy)
  • identify the meaning of certain movements, colors, gestures by cultures

Apogée code

GDPI023T

Objectives

Understanding the effect and purpose of common clauses in international business agreements and identifying the risks related thereto and getting an overview of the legal environment of international business.

Skills to be acquired

Assuming that the students, with no legal background yet, might, as future managers, sales agents, purchasers, etc., get involved in contract negotiations, it appears worthful to asses some common pitfalls and associated risks during the contracting process and give an overview of the terms and conditions that should be at the top of any contract checklist.
The aim being to introduce students to the principles of contract drafting (theoretical overview and practical illustrations) and provide background information to increase understanding of the legal effect and purpose of some common contracting clauses.
Students will get an overview of the legal environment of international business and develop an understanding of common legal instruments and sources.

Program

1. Negotiating international business agreements: avoiding pitfalls and understanding the effect and purpose of most common contracting clauses (3h)
2. Getting an overview of the legal environment of international business and developing an understanding of common legal instruments and sources (INCOTERMs, CISG, European directives and regulations, …) (3h)

Bibliography

no

Prerequisites

None

Assessment method

Interactive quiz (test of legal knowledge ; assessment)

Apogée code

GDPI002T

Objectives

Preparation for CFA level 1

Skills to be acquired

In-depth knowledge of finance

Program

▪ Ethical and Professional Standards
▪ Quantitative Methods
▪ Financial Statement Analysis
▪ Economics
▪ Derivatives Investments
▪ Alternative Investments

Bibliography

Réussir le CFA level 1, Cours et Exercices, By Norberto Cordisco Respighi and Christine Verpeaux, Barchen

Prerequisites

L3 SGM / M1 Finance

Evaluation method

Quiz.

Apogée code

GASRA03U

Objectives
 
The aim of the course is to explain the rules which govern the preparation of financial statements for organisations which comply with international standards.
 
Skills to be acquired
 
The students will be able to:
  • Understand the objective of general purpose financial reporting and identify the primary users of financial reports
  • Explain the qualitative characteristics of useful financial information
  • Understand the important assumptions which underlie the preparation of financial statements
  • Understand the criteria which determine whether or not an element should be recognised in the financial statements
  • Understand the structure and content of each component of a set of financial statements
  • Prepare a statement of financial position, a statement of comprehensive income and a statement of changes in equity, in accordance with the requirements of IAS 1

Program

1)    The regulatory framework
2)    The IASB conceptual framework
3)    Discounting and present value
4)    Presentation of financial statements
5)    The statement of cash flows
6)    Analysis of financial statements

Bibliography

International Financial Reporting – A practical guide 6th Edition, Alan Melville, Pearson

Prerequisites

A basic understanding of accounting principles would be useful but is not mandatory.

Apogée code

GAFI011M

Objectives
 
This course prepares students to analyse and evaluate critical issues regarding the social, ethical and environmental responsibilities of business, to transfer sustainability-related knowledge and ethical theories to business practice, and to assess the relevance of CSR tools and apply them to specific business needs.
In order to become managers, students need to demonstrate critical awareness of corporate social responsibility issues in management.
This module supports the MBAIM program learning outcomes related to students being able to:
1.    Integrate sustainability practices into company management and policies, thus creating sustainable value.
2.    Manage organizational change and innovation, as building CSR into the company’s management often requires significant change.
This module enables students to find responsible solutions to business problems by finding innovative solutions taking into consideration international and interdisciplinary differences.
 

Skills to be acquired

The students will be able to:
1.    Critically evaluate the theoretical and conceptual approaches to CSR.
2.    Appraise how a company identifies its stakeholders and manages the relationships with them.
3.    Assess the strategic opportunities provided by CSR and sustainability.
4.    Apply the concepts of CSR to formulate recommendations at the managerial level.

Program

This module is designed to enable students to deal with social and environmental challenges and the related ethical dilemmas. The main subjects covered include:
•    Introduction to CSR and sustainability.
•    CSR concepts and theories.
•    CSR, leadership and governance.
•    Stakeholder theory and management.
•    The institutional environment of CSR.
•    CSR, sustainability and corporate strategy.
•    Embedding CSR in management and organization.
•    Sustainable banking and socially responsible investment.

Bibliography

•    Crane, Andrew & Matten, Dirk. Business Ethics, Oxford, University Press, latest edition.
•    Weiss, Joseph W.  Business Ethics: A Stakeholder and Issues Management Approach. Thomson Southwestern

Prerequisites

Students are expected to have a business undergraduate degree and to have a good knowledge of corporate policy and strategy and of management in all its dimensions.

Apogée code

GAFI033M

  • Objectives

    Based on the understanding of the mutidimensionnality of the working conditions & the psychosocial risks, the main objective is to learn how to think and to build strategies to manage stress in the workplace and to conduct change in firms which prevent psychosocial risks.

    Skills to be acquired

    –    Understand how to change organizations in order to prevent psychosocial risks
    –    Be able to build strategies to prevent psychosocial risks and to manage stress in the workplace
    –    Be able to manage change in a company and to perform the organization and managers ability to change.

    Program

    1. What is a psychosocial risk?     The workplace context, the working conditions, the types of psychosocial risks and stress, the person, the burnout
    2. Three influential theoretical models to establish a relationship between psychosocial risks and health: interactionist, transactional and organizational justice
    3. Strategies to manage stress in the workplace: the actors, the types of prevention, acting regarding the context
    4. Change diagnosis: types and context of change
    5.Change management: people’s reactions against change, resistance toward change, change models
    6. How to create a context in favor of change? Individuals accompanying, organizational ability to change
    The course, case studies, videos, the emotional intelligence test

    Apogée code

    GRHI003U

Objectives

The international week has a two-fold objective, via a course on a specific theme given by an international colleague, to (1) develop students’ knowledge and skills in their field of specialization (respectively HR, marketing, finance and management control) and (2) introduce them to the management of cross-cultural situations.

Skills to be acquired

The main skills to be acquired are
1.    know how to identify a cross-cultural situation;
2.    understand the issues associated with an intercultural situation and those associated with a culture shock;
3.    develop a capacity for concentration and management skills, within the framework of a seminar taught according to American pedagogical methods.

Program

•    finance-Management Control : Financial analysis, business valuation & Corporate Governance – Prof. Michel Maignan, Concordia University (Canada)
•    Human Resources : HR, Leadership & Resilience – Prof. Frances Gunn, Ryerson University (Canada)
•    Marketing : Advertising – Dr Amy Jones, University of West Alabama (USA)
    Class 1. Food marketing and advertising
    Class 2. The Impact of Sports on Society and the Advertising Industry
    Class 3. Social issues in advertising

Bibliography

Material and readings given in December 2020
Prerequisites

Fundamentals in business strategy, human resources management, financial management, accounting and marketing.

Assessment method

Multiple choice questions on all readings, lectures & workshops – Duration: 30 min.

These courses are given at CIREFE (Centre international rennais d’études de français pour étrangers) – Université de Rennes 2 – and organised by language level.

Contacts

Thiri Nandar

Incoming exchange students coordinator

Tél. +33 2 23 23 60 06

thiri.nandar@univ-rennes1.fr

 

Thi Le Hoa VO